Birds of a feather really DO flock together! Pigeons stay in a group in the presence of predators rather than moving to protect themselves, study finds

Press/Media: ResearchAcademic

Description

- UK experts performed experiments with flocks of pigeons and a robot predator
- The pigeons stayed together in the presence of predators for the flock's benefit
- It was thought pigeons selfishly fly to the centre of a herd to protect themselves
- This selfish herd theory was first proposed to clarify why animals move in groups

Period4-Jun-2021

Media coverage

2

Media coverage

  • TitleBirds of a feather really DO flock together! Pigeons stay in a group in the presence of predators rather than moving to protect themselves, study finds
    Degree of recognitionInternational
    Media name/outletMail Online
    Media typeWeb
    Country/TerritoryUnited Kingdom
    Date04/06/2021
    Description- UK experts performed experiments with flocks of pigeons and a robot predator
    - The pigeons stayed together in the presence of predators for the flock's benefit
    - It was thought pigeons selfishly fly to the centre of a herd to protect themselves
    - This selfish herd theory was first proposed to clarify why animals move in groups
    Producer/AuthorJonathan Chadwick
    URLhttps://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-9648615/Pigeons-flock-presence-predators-study-shows.html
    PersonsRolf Storms, Robert Musters, Charlotte Hemelrijk
  • TitleRobo-falcons can stop pigeons crashing into planes and causing fatal accidents
    Degree of recognitionInternational
    Media name/outletThe Telegraph
    Media typePrint
    Country/TerritoryUnited Kingdom
    Date04/06/2021
    DescriptionRemote-control artificial birds can usher pigeons away from airfields to reduce risk of 'bird strikes'
    Producer/AuthorOlivia Rudgard
    URLhttps://www.telegraph.co.uk/environment/2021/06/04/robo-falcons-can-stop-pigeons-crashing-planes-causing-fatal/
    PersonsRolf Storms, Robert Musters, Charlotte Hemelrijk