Mendel was actually looking for innovative crops

Press/Media: ResearchAcademic

Description

Gregor Mendel, the monk who became famous for his pioneering work in plant genetics, initially wanted to create new, better crops. Only at a later stage did he become fascinated by how plant traits are inherited. This is the conclusion of a study published by plant breeding researcher Peter van Dijk in the scientific journal Genetics. Van Dijk works at KeyGene, a research company based in Wageningen, the Netherlands. Van Dijk's findings are based on two recently discovered newspaper articles from 1861. They contradict what many historians have written about Mendel's motives and demonstrate that the origin of breeding of innovative, improved vegetable crops can be traced back to as early as the 19th century.

Period5-Oct-2018

Media coverage

1

Media coverage

  • TitleMendel was actually looking for innovative crops
    Degree of recognitionInternational
    Media name/outletSeedQuest
    Media typeWeb
    CountryUnited States
    Date05/10/2018
    DescriptionGregor Mendel, the monk who became famous for his pioneering work in plant genetics, initially wanted to create new, better crops. Only at a later stage did he become fascinated by how plant traits are inherited. This is the conclusion of a study published by plant breeding researcher Peter van Dijk in the scientific journal Genetics. Van Dijk works at KeyGene, a research company based in Wageningen, the Netherlands. Van Dijk's findings are based on two recently discovered newspaper articles from 1861. They contradict what many historians have written about Mendel's motives and demonstrate that the origin of breeding of innovative, improved vegetable crops can be traced back to as early as the 19th century.
    Producer/AuthorWUR
    URLwww.seedquest.com/news.php?type=news&id_article=101589&id_region=&id_category=&id_crop=
    PersonsFranz Weissing