X-ray images keep track of scanned protons

    Press/Media: ResearchPopular

    Description

    The Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland was a pioneer in the development of pencil-beam scanned proton therapy. The site's newest proton gantry – Gantry 2 – is dedicated to fast scanning, offering the ability to perform ultrafast volumetric target repainting and intensity-modulated proton therapy. But while active scanned proton delivery offers many advantages over passively scattered protons, the technique is also particularly sensitive to geometric and temporal variations.

    Period24-May-2012

    Media coverage

    1

    Media coverage

    • TitleX-ray images keep track of scanned protons
      Degree of recognitionInternational
      Media name/outletmedicalphysicsweb
      Media typeWeb
      Date24/05/2012
      DescriptionThe Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland was a pioneer in the development of pencil-beam scanned proton therapy. The site's newest proton gantry – Gantry 2 – is dedicated to fast scanning, offering the ability to perform ultrafast volumetric target repainting and intensity-modulated proton therapy. But while active scanned proton delivery offers many advantages over passively scattered protons, the technique is also particularly sensitive to geometric and temporal variations.
      URLmedicalphysicsweb.org/cws/article/research/49766
      PersonsAntje Knopf