A benefit-risk review of systemic halemostatic agents - Part 2: In excessive or heavy menstrual bleeding

Ian S. Fraser*, Robert J. Porte, Peter A. Kouides, Andrea S. Lukes

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The first part of this benefit-risk review examined the efficacy and adverse effect profiles of systemic haemostatic agents commonly used in major surgery. The second part of this review examines the efficacy and adverse effect profiles of systemic haemostatic agents commonly used in the treatment of excessive or heavy menstrual bleeding, and provides individual benefit-risk profiles that may assist clinicians in selecting appropriate pharmacological therapy in this setting. Historically, surgery has played a dominant role in treatment; however, pharmacological therapy is increasingly popular, especially in women who wish to retain their fertility. When selecting the appropriate treatment, patient preference should be considered, as well as the benefits and risks associated with each agent. Recommended pharmacological therapies that are effective and generally well tolerated include the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system and the oral agents tranexamic acid, NSAIDs (e.g. mefenamic acid) and combined estrogen/progestogen oral contraceptives. In patients with an underlying bleeding disorder (e.g. von Willebrand disease), an additional option is intranasal desmopressin.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)275-282
Number of pages8
JournalDrug Safety
Volume31
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 2008

Keywords

  • VENOUS THROMBOEMBOLIC DISEASE
  • LEVONORGESTREL INTRAUTERINE SYSTEM
  • RANDOMIZED COMPARATIVE TRIAL
  • COMBINED ORAL-CONTRACEPTIVES
  • HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY
  • VON-WILLEBRAND-DISEASE
  • TRANEXAMIC ACID
  • BLOOD-LOSS
  • MEFENAMIC-ACID
  • IDIOPATHIC MENORRHAGIA

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