Advanced glycation end-products (AGES) and heart failure: Pathophysiology and clinical implications

Jasper W. L. Hartog*, Adriaan A. Voors, Stephan J. L. Bakker, Andries J. Smit, Dirk J. van Veldhuisen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

234 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are molecules formed during a non-enzymatic reaction between proteins and sugar residues, called the Maillard reaction. AGEs accumulate in the human body with age, and accumulation is accelerated in the presence of diabetes mellitus. In patients with diabetes, AGE accumulation is associated with the development of cardiac dysfunction. Enhanced AGE accumulation is not restricted to patients with diabetes, but can also occur in renal failure, enhanced states of oxidative stress, and by an increased intake of AGEs. Several lines of evidence suggest that AGEs are related to the development and progression of heart failure in non-diabetic patients as well. Preliminary small intervention studies with AGE cross-link breakers in heart failure patients have shown promising results. In this review, the role of AGEs in the development of heart failure and the role of AGE intervention as a possible treatment for heart failure are discussed. (c) 2007 European Society of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier B.V All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1146-1155
Number of pages10
JournalEuropean Journal of Heart Failure
Volume9
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec-2007

Keywords

  • heart failure
  • advanced glycation end-products
  • atherosclerosis
  • oxidative stress
  • cross-linking
  • CROSS-LINK BREAKER
  • LOW-DENSITY-LIPOPROTEIN
  • FACTOR-KAPPA-B
  • CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE
  • SKIN AUTOFLUORESCENCE
  • AMINOGUANIDINE PREVENTS
  • TRANSPLANT DYSFUNCTION
  • INCREASED ACCUMULATION
  • DIASTOLIC FUNCTION
  • DIABETES-MELLITUS

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