Affordances-in-practice: an ethnographic critique of social media logic and context collapse

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    Abstract

    Drawing on data gathered during ethnographic fieldwork in Mardin, a medium-sized town in southeast Turkey, this article shows that social media users actively appropriate online platforms and change privacy settings in order to keep different social spheres and social groups apart. Keeping different online social contexts distinct from each other is taken for granted as a way of using social media in Mardin. By contrast, social media scholars have extensively discussed the effects of social media in terms of context collapse. The article highlights how context collapse is the result of patterns of usage within Anglo-American contexts and not the consequence of a platform's architecture or social media logic. It then suggests a theoretical refinement of affordances, and proposes the concept of affordances-in-practice.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)3641-3656
    Number of pages16
    JournalNew Media and Society
    Volume20
    Issue number10
    Early online date19-Feb-2018
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Oct-2018

    Keywords

    • DIGITAL MEDIA
    • COMMUNICATION
    • FRIENDSHIP
    • FACEBOOK

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