Alcohol consumption and risk of peripheral arterial disease - The Rotterdam Study

R Vliegenthart, JM Geleijnse, A Hofman, WT Meijer, FJA van Rooij, DE Grobbee, JCM Witteman*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

59 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Moderate alcohol consumption is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. Data on alcohol consumption and atherosclerosis are scarce. To determine the association between alcohol consumption and risk of peripheral arterial disease, the authors carried out a cross-sectional study (1990-1993) in the population-based Rotterdam Study among men and women aged 55 years or over. Data on alcohol consumption and peripheral arterial disease, as measured by the ankle/brachial blood pressure index, were available for 3,975 participants without symptomatic cardiovascular disease. Male drinkers consumed beer, wine, and liquor, while female drinkers consumed predominantly wine and fortified wine types. An inverse relation between moderate alcohol consumption and peripheral arterial disease was found in women but not in men. Because of residual confounding by smoking, analyses were repeated in nonsmokers. In nonsmoking men, odds ratios were 0.86 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.46, 1.63) for daily alcohol consumption up to and including 10 g, 0.75 (95% CI: 0.37, 1.55) for 11-20 g, and 0.68 (95% CI: 0.35, 1.34) for more than 20 g, compared with nondrinking. In nonsmoking women, corresponding odds ratios were 0.65 (95% CI: 0.48, 0.87), 0.66 (95% CI: 0.42, 1.05), and 0.41 (95% CI: 0,21, 0.77), respectively. In conclusion, an inverse association between alcohol consumption and peripheral arterial disease was found in nonsmoking men and women.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)332-338
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Epidemiology
Volume155
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 15-Feb-2002

Keywords

  • aged
  • alcohol drinking
  • alcoholic beverages
  • atherosclerosis
  • CORONARY HEART-DISEASE
  • LOW-DENSITY-LIPOPROTEIN
  • GENERAL-POPULATION
  • EDINBURGH ARTERY
  • MORTALITY
  • CHOLESTEROL
  • PHYSICIANS
  • PREVALENCE
  • OXIDATION
  • HEALTH

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