Alternative Sampling Devices to Collect Dried Blood Microsamples: State-of-the-Art

Lisa Delahaye, Herman Veenhof, Birgit C P Koch, Jan-Willem C Alffenaar, Rafael Linden, Christophe Stove*

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    Abstract

    ABSTRACT: Dried blood spots (DBS) have been utilized in newborn screening programs for several years. More recently, there has been growing interest in using DBS as a home sampling tool for the quantitative determination of analytes. However, this presents challenges, mainly due to the well-known hematocrit effect and other DBS-specific parameters, including spotted volume and punch site, which could add to the method uncertainty. Therefore, new microsampling devices that quantitatively collect capillary dried blood are continuously being developed.In this review, we provided an overview of devices that are commercially available or under development that allow the quantitative (volumetric) collection of dried blood(-based) microsamples, and are meant to be used for home or remote sampling. Considering the field of therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM), we examined different aspects that are important for a device to be implemented in clinical practice, including ease of patient use, technical performance, and ease of integration in the workflow of a clinical laboratory. Costs related to microsampling devices are briefly discussed, as this additionally plays an important role in the decision-making process.Although the added-value of home sampling for TDM and the willingness of patients to perform home sampling has been demonstrated in some studies, real clinical implementation is progressing at a slower pace. More extensive evaluation of these newly developed devices, not only analytically but also clinically, is needed to demonstrate their real-life applicability, which is a prerequisite for their use in the field of TDM.

    Original languageEnglish
    JournalTherapeutic Drug Monitoring
    DOIs
    Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 18-Jan-2021

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