Alzheimer's disease: Neurotransmitters of the sleep-wake cycle

Jan Van Erum, Debby Van Dam, Peter Paul De Deyn*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)
179 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

With aging, our sleeping pattern alters. Elderly often wake unrested because their sleep time and sleep efficacy is reduced. In Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, these alterations are even more pronounced and may further aggravate cognitive decline. Therefore, sleep disturbances greatly impact self-care ability, caregiver exhaustion and institutionalization rate. Reestablishing an effective sleep-wake cycle in these patients still remains an unresolved challenge, partly because sleep physiology is quite complex and multiple neurotransmitter systems contribute to a single process. Gaining a better understanding of sleep physiology will be crucial for further research. Conjointly, animal models, along with a multidisciplinary approach, will be of great value to establish a common ground between AD and sleep disturbances and work towards a potential therapeutic application.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)72-80
Number of pages9
JournalNeuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
Volume105
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct-2019

Keywords

  • Sleep physiology
  • Neurotransmitters
  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Mouse models
  • SLOW-WAVE SLEEP
  • TRANSGENIC MOUSE MODEL
  • AMYLOID-BETA LEVELS
  • REM-SLEEP
  • SUPRACHIASMATIC NUCLEUS
  • CIRCADIAN RHYTHMICITY
  • RISK-FACTOR
  • BRAIN
  • EEG
  • AGE

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