Associations Between Clinician-Graded Facial Function and Patient-Reported Quality of Life in Adults With Peripheral Facial Palsy A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

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Abstract

IMPORTANCE Understanding how the quality of life of adults (>= 18 years) with peripheral facial palsy can be estimated using clinician measures of facial function and patient-reported variables might aid in counseling patients and in conducting research.

OBJECTIVES To analyze associations between clinician-graded facial function and patient-reported quality of life in adults with peripheral facial palsy, compare associations between facial function and the physical and social functions of quality of life, and examine factors that might influence the associations.

DATA SOURCES A literature search was conducted in PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, Web of Science and PsycInfo on June 4, 2020, with no restrictions on the start date.

STUDY SELECTION Twenty-three studies reporting an association between clinician-graded facial function and patient-reported quality of life in adults with peripheral facial palsy were included. Facial function instruments included the House-Brackmann, Sunnybrook Facial Grading System, and electronic clinician-graded facial function assessment. Quality-of-life instruments included the Facial Disability Index and Facial Clinimetric Evaluation Scale.

DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS Data extraction and qualitative synthesis were performed according to the Meta-analysis of Observational Studies in Epidemiology guidelines. Record screening, data extraction, and quality assessments were done by 2 researchers independently. Data were pooled using random-effects models.

MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The main outcome was the association between facial function and quality of life, quantified by Pearson r, Spearman rho, or regression analysis.

RESULTS In total, 23 studies (3746 participants) were included. In the 21 studies that reported on the sex of the cohorts, there were 2073 women (57.3%). Mean or median age ranged from 21 to 64 years and mean or median duration of palsy ranged from newly diagnosed to 12 years. Bell palsy (n = 1397), benign tumor (n = 980), and infection (n = 257) were the most common etiologic factors. Pooled correlation coefficients were 0.424 (95% CI, 0.375-0.471) to 0.533 (95% CI, 0.447-0.610) between facial function and Facial Clinimetric Evaluation Scale total, 0.324 (95% CI, 0.128-0.495) to 0.397 (95% CI, 0.242-0.532) between facial function and Facial Clinimetric Evaluation Scale social function, 0.423 (95% CI, 0.322-0.514) to 0.605 (95% CI, -0.124-0.910) between facial function and Facial Disability Index physical function, and 0.166 (95% CI, 0.044-0.283) to 0.208 (95% CI, 0.031-0.373) between facial function and Facial Disability Index social function.

CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Associations noted in this systematic review and meta-analysis were overall low to moderate, suggesting that only a small part of quality of life is explained by facial function. Associations were higher between facial function and physical function than social function of quality of life.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)717-728
Number of pages12
JournalJAMA Otolaryngology. Head & Neck Surgery
Volume147
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1-Jul-2021

Keywords

  • DISABILITY INDEX FDI
  • PSYCHOLOGICAL DISTRESS
  • GRADING SYSTEM
  • BELLS-PALSY
  • PARALYSIS
  • VALIDATION
  • SCALE
  • RELIABILITY
  • INSTRUMENT
  • DEPRESSION

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