Bequests and Informal Long-Term Care: Evidence from HRS Exit Interviews

Max Groneck*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Informal long-term caregiving for frail elderly individuals by their children may induce parents to compensate their children for their help. To test this hypothesis, I use the exit interview from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS). My results show that the decision to care for one's parents has a significant positive impact on the incidence and amount of bequests received. In addition, increasing the amount of care relative to one's siblings significantly increases the proportion of bequest within a family. Furthermore, I find that the positive nexus of caregiving and bequest requires a written will as a contract between the parent and the helping child.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)531-572
Number of pages42
JournalJournal of human resources
Volume52
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • INTER-VIVOS TRANSFERS
  • BEQUEST MOTIVES
  • Informal care
  • Long-Term Care
  • BEQUESTS

Cite this