Bullying and victimization in elementary schools: A comparison of bullies, victims, bully/victims, and uninvolved preadolescents

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Abstract

Research on bullying and victimization largely rests on univariate analyses and on reports from a single informant. Researchers may thus know too little about the simultaneous effects of various independent and dependent variables, and their research may be biased by shared method variance. The database for this Dutch study was large (N = 1,065) and rich enough to allow multivariate analysis and multisource information. In addition, the effect of familial vulnerability for internalizing and externalizing disorders was studied. Gender, aggressiveness, isolation, and dislikability were most strongly related to bullying and victimization. Among the many findings that deviated from or enhanced the univariate knowledge base were that not only victims and bully/victims but bullies as well were disliked and that parenting was unrelated to bullying and victimization once other factors were controlled.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)672-682
Number of pages11
JournalDevelopmental Psychology
Volume41
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul-2005
Event18th Biennial Meeting of the International-Society-for-the-Study-of-Behavioral-Development - , Belgium
Duration: 11-Jul-200415-Jul-2004

Keywords

  • bullying
  • childhood development
  • peer relations
  • psychosocial factors
  • victimization
  • PEER VICTIMIZATION
  • EARLY ADOLESCENCE
  • MIDDLE SCHOOL
  • PSYCHOSOCIAL ADJUSTMENT
  • PSYCHIATRIC-SYMPTOMS
  • AGGRESSIVE VICTIMS
  • MENTAL-HEALTH
  • SOCIAL-STATUS
  • CHILDREN
  • CHILDHOOD

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