Cerebral monitoring in surgical ICU patients

Dario Massari, Ilonka N de Keijzer, Thomas W L Scheeren*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To give an overview of cerebral monitoring techniques for surgical ICU patients.

RECENT FINDINGS: As the burden of postsurgical neurological and neurocognitive complications becomes increasingly recognized, cerebral monitoring in the surgical ICU might gain a relevant role in detecting and possibly preventing adverse outcomes. However, identifying neurological alterations in surgical ICU patients, who are often sedated and mechanically ventilated, can be challenging. Various noninvasive and invasive techniques are available for cerebral monitoring, providing an assessment of cortical electrical activity, cerebral oxygenation, blood flow autoregulation, intracranial pressure, and cerebral metabolism. These techniques can be used for the diagnosis of subclinical seizures, the assessment of sedation depth and delirium, the detection of an impaired cerebral blood flow, and the diagnosis of neurosurgical complications.

SUMMARY: Cerebral monitoring can be a valuable tool in the early detection of adverse outcomes in surgical ICU patients, but the evidence is limited, and clear clinical indications are still lacking.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)701-708
Number of pages8
JournalCurrent opinion in critical care
Volume27
Issue number6
Early online date1-Sep-2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec-2021

Keywords

  • cerebral autoregulation
  • cerebral monitoring
  • cerebral oxygenation
  • electroencephalography
  • intracranial pressure
  • INTENSIVE-CARE-UNIT
  • CARDIAC-SURGERY
  • BISPECTRAL INDEX
  • CONTINUOUS EEG
  • POSTOPERATIVE DELIRIUM
  • CONSENSUS STATEMENT
  • BLOOD-FLOW
  • SEDATION
  • AUTOREGULATION
  • ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY

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