Chimpanzee police?

Otto Adang*

*Corresponding author for this work

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Abstract

People like to make comparisons between humans and other animals when they think a comparison helps them to make a point (e.g. that some human behavior can or cannot be considered to be ‘natural’) or to have a laugh when animals act in ways that are seen as funny or cute. There are a lot of misunderstandings about the feasibility of these kinds of comparisons and this chapter deals with the way in which meaningful use can be made of studies into animal behavior, using research into chimpanzee behavior (and specifically research into chimpanzee conflict regulation) as an example. The conclusion is that there are three ways in which ethological studies into non-human animal behavior can be relevant for an increased understanding of human behavior: by using ethological methods of systematic observation, by asking relevant research questions and by generating new hypotheses.
Translated title of the contributionChimpanzee police?
Original languageDutch
Pages (from-to)456-464
Number of pages9
JournalPROCES
Volume99
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 4-Jan-2021

Keywords

  • police
  • animal human comparison
  • CHIMPANZEES

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