CLINICAL MANAGEMENT OF SALIVARY GLAND HYPOFUNCTION AND XEROSTOMIA IN HEAD-AND-NECK CANCER PATIENTS: SUCCESSES AND BARRIERS

Arjan Vissink, James B. Mitchell, Bruce J. Baum, Kirsten H. Limesand, Siri Beier Jensen, Philip C. Fox, Linda S. Elting, Johannes A. Langendijk, Robert P. Coppes, Mary E. Reyland*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

207 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The most significant long-term complication of radiotherapy in the head-and-neck region is hyposalivation and its related complaints, particularily xerostomia. This review addresses the pathophysiology underlying irradiation damage to salivary gland tissue, the consequences of radiation injury, and issues contributing to the clinical management of salivary gland hypofunction and xerostomia. These include ways to (1) prevent or minimize radiation injury of salivary gland tissue, (2) manage radiation-induced hyposalivation and xerostomia, and (3) restore the function of salivary gland tissue damaged by radiotherapy. (C) 2010 Elsevier Inc.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)983-991
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics
Volume78
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15-Nov-2010

Keywords

  • Radiotherapy
  • Hyposalivation
  • Xerostomia
  • Prevention
  • Palliative care
  • Gene transfer
  • Stem cell therapy
  • RADIATION-INDUCED XEROSTOMIA
  • PROPHYLACTIC PILOCARPINE TREATMENT
  • ADENOVIRAL-MEDIATED TRANSFER
  • INTENSITY-MODULATED PHOTON
  • INCREASED FLUID SECRETION
  • RAT SUBMANDIBULAR-GLAND
  • QUALITY-OF-LIFE
  • ORAL PILOCARPINE
  • PROTON THERAPY
  • DOUBLE-BLIND

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