Cognitive Coping, Goal Adjustment, and Depressive and Anxiety Symptoms in People Undergoing Infertility Treatment A Prospective Study

Vivian Kraaij*, Nadia Garnefski, Maya J. Schroevers, Janneke Weijmer, Frans Helmerhorst

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The relationships between cognitive coping strategies, goal adjustment, and symptoms of depression and anxiety were studied in people with fertility problems. Both cross-sectional and prospective relationships were studied in a sample of 313 patients attending an infertility clinic. Self-report questionnaires were filled out at home. Positive refocusing, rumination and catastrophizing, and goal reengagement were related to symptoms of depression and anxiety. When looking at the long-term effects, rumination and catastrophizing were also related to emotional problems nine months later. These findings suggest that intervention programs should focus on cognitive coping strategies and goal-based processes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)876-886
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Health Psychology
Volume15
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep-2010

Keywords

  • anxiety
  • coping
  • depression
  • goals
  • infertility
  • HIV-INFECTED MEN
  • IN-VITRO FERTILIZATION
  • BEHAVIORAL STRESS-MANAGEMENT
  • EMOTION REGULATION
  • PSYCHOLOGICAL DISTRESS
  • MYOCARDIAL-INFARCTION
  • FERTILITY TREATMENT
  • HOSPITAL ANXIETY
  • SELF-REGULATION
  • NEGATIVE AFFECT

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