Comparison of mothers', fathers', and teachers' reports on problem behavior in 5-to 6-year-old children

H Grietens*, P Onghena, P Prinzie, E Gadeyne, Kristof Van Assche, P Ghesquiere, W Hellinckx

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

111 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Evidence exists that there is low agreement between multiple informants reporting on children's and adolescents' behavior problems. Few studies, however, focus on agreement between informants in specific age groups. This study examined correspondence and disagreement between mother, father, and teacher reports of problem behavior by analyzing CBCL and TRF data of 2 nonclinical samples of 5- to 6-year-old preschool children (N = 424). Findings indicated that interrater agreement was low to moderate. This was shown by the intercorrelations, the explained variance in regression analyses and the little overlap in the number of children rated as behaviorally disturbed by all 3 informants. Agreement between mother and father reports was highest, whereas agreement between mother and teacher reports was lowest. Disagreement between informants was highest for internalizing problems. Potential explanations for the lack of agreement are discussed. Guidelines are formulated to refine assessment and optimize clinical decision-making processes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)137-146
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment
Volume26
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Jun-2004

Keywords

  • problem behavior
  • CBCL
  • TRF
  • parent-teacher agreement
  • MULTIPLE INFORMANTS
  • SITUATIONAL SPECIFICITY
  • EXTERNALIZING BEHAVIOR
  • EMOTIONAL-PROBLEMS
  • DEPRESSED MOTHERS
  • CONDUCT PROBLEMS
  • PARENTS
  • AGREEMENT
  • RATINGS
  • STABILITY

Cite this