Cost-Effectiveness of Dengue Vaccination in Indonesia: Considering Integrated Programs withWolbachia-Infected Mosquitos and Health Education

Auliya A. Suwantika*, Angga P. Kautsar, Woro Supadmi, Neily Zakiyah, Rizky Abdulah, Mohammad Ali, Maarten J. Postma

*Corresponding author for this work

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Abstract

Despite the fact that morbidity and mortality rates due to dengue infection in Indonesia are relatively high, a dengue vaccination has not yet been introduced. Next to vaccination,Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes and health education have been considered to be potential interventions to prevent dengue infection in Indonesia. This study was aimed to analyse the cost-effectiveness of dengue vaccination in Indonesia whilst takingWolbachiaand health education programs into account. An age-structured decision tree model was developed to assess the cost-effectiveness. Approximately 4,701,100 children were followed-up in a 10-year time horizon within a 1-year analytical cycle. We compared three vaccination strategies: one focussing on vaccination only, another combining vaccination and aWolbachiaprogram, and a third scenario combining vaccination and health education. All scenarios were compared with a no-intervention strategy. The result showed that only vaccination would reduce dengue fever (DF), dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF), and dengue shock syndrome (DSS) by 123,203; 97,140 and 283 cases, respectively. It would save treatment cost at $10.3 million and $6.2 million from the healthcare and payer perspectives, respectively. The combination of vaccination and aWolbachiaprogram would reduce DF, DHF and DSS by 292,488; 230,541; and 672 cases, respectively. It would also save treatment cost at $24.3 million and $14.6 million from the healthcare and payer perspectives, respectively. The combination of vaccination and health education would reduce DF, DHF, and DSS by 187,986; 148,220; and 432 cases, respectively. It would save treatment cost at $15.6 million and $9.4 million from the healthcare and payer perspectives, respectively. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) from the healthcare perspective were estimated to be $9995, $4460, and $6399 per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained for the respective scenarios. ICERs from the payer perspective were slightly higher. It can be concluded that vaccination combined with aWolbachiaprogram was confirmed to be the most cost-effective intervention. Dengue infection rate, vaccine efficacy, cost ofWolbachiaprogram, underreporting factor for hospitalization, vaccine price and mortality rate were considered to be the most influential parameters affecting the ICERs.

Original languageEnglish
Article number4217
Pages (from-to)1-15
Number of pages14
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume17
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 12-Jun-2020

Keywords

  • dengue fever (DF)
  • dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF)
  • dengue shock syndrome (DSS)
  • cost-effective
  • incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICER)
  • WOLBACHIA
  • BURDEN

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