Current status of laparoscopic and robotic ventral mesh rectopexy for external and internal rectal prolapse

Jan J. van Iersel, Tim J. C. Paulides, Paul M. Verheijen, John W. Lumley, Ivo A. M. J. Broeders, Esther C. J. Consten*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleAcademicpeer-review

47 Citations (Scopus)
58 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

External and internal rectal prolapse with their affiliated rectocele and enterocele, are associated with debilitating symptoms such as obstructed defecation, pelvic pain and faecal incontinence. Since perineal procedures are associated with a higher recurrence rate, an abdominal approach is commonly preferred. Despite the description of greater than three hundred different procedures, thus far no clear superiority of one surgical technique has been demonstrated. Ventral mesh rectopexy (VMR) is a relatively new and promising technique to correct rectal prolapse. In contrast to the abdominal procedures of past decades, VMR avoids posterolateral rectal mobilisation and thereby minimizes the risk of postoperative constipation. Because of a perceived acceptable recurrence rate, good functional results and low mesh-related morbidity in the short to medium term, VMR has been popularized in the past decade. Laparoscopic or robotic-assisted VMR is now being progressively performed internationally and several articles and guidelines propose the procedure as the treatment of choice for rectal prolapse. In this article, an outline of the current status of laparoscopic and robotic ventral mesh rectopexy for the treatment of internal and external rectal prolapse is presented.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4977-4987
Number of pages11
JournalWorld Journal of Gastroenterology
Volume22
Issue number21
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7-Jun-2016
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Laparoscopic ventral mesh rectopexy
  • Robot
  • Rectal prolapse
  • External rectal prolapse
  • Internal rectal prolapse
  • Rectocele
  • Mesh erosion
  • Obstructed defecation
  • Faecal incontinence
  • Biological mesh
  • OBSTRUCTED DEFECATION SYNDROME
  • FECAL INCONTINENCE
  • ANTERIOR RECTOPEXY
  • RECTOANAL INTUSSUSCEPTION
  • ABDOMINAL RECTOPEXY
  • SURGICAL TECHNIQUE
  • COMPLEX RECTOCELE
  • BIOLOGICAL MESH
  • SCORING SYSTEM
  • MANAGEMENT

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