Delayed Effects of Corticosterone on Slow After-Hyperpolarization Potentials in Mouse Hippocampal versus Prefrontal Cortical Pyramidal Neurons

Anup G. Pillai*, Marloes J. A. G. Henckens, Guillen Fernandez, Marian Joels

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

The rodent stress hormone corticosterone changes neuronal activity in a slow and persistent manner through transcriptional regulation. In the rat dorsal hippocampus, corticosterone enhances the amplitude of calcium-dependent potassium currents that cause a lingering slow after-hyperpolarization (sAHP) at the end of depolarizing events. In this study we compared the putative region-dependency of the delayed effects of corticosterone (approximately 5 hrs after treatment) on sAHP as well as other active and passive properties of layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons from three prefrontal areas, i.e. the lateral orbitofrontal, prelimbic and infralimbic cortex, with the hippocampus of adult mice. In agreement with previous studies, corticosterone increased sAHP amplitude in the dorsal hippocampus with depolarizing steps of increasing amplitude. However, in the lateral orbitofrontal, prelimbic and infralimbic cortices we did not observe any modifications of sAHP amplitude after corticosterone treatment. Properties of single action potentials or % ratio of the last spike interval with respect to the first spike interval, an indicator of accommodation in an action potential train, were not significantly affected by corticosterone in all brain regions examined. Lastly, corticosterone treatment did not induce any lasting changes in passive membrane properties of hippocampal or cortical neurons. Overall, the data indicate that corticosterone slowly and very persistently increases the sAHP amplitude in hippocampal pyramidal neurons, while this is not the case in the cortical regions examined. This implies that changes in excitability across brain regions reached by corticosterone may vary over a prolonged period of time after stress.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere99208
Number of pages11
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume9
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 5-Jun-2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • SPIKE-FREQUENCY ADAPTATION
  • CALCIUM CURRENT AMPLITUDE
  • LONG-TERM POTENTIATION
  • GLUCOCORTICOID-RECEPTOR
  • CHRONIC STRESS
  • BASOLATERAL AMYGDALA
  • VENTRAL HIPPOCAMPUS
  • DENDRITIC MORPHOLOGY
  • LATERAL AMYGDALA
  • DECISION-MAKING

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