Differences in Mating Propensity Between Immature Female Color Morphs in the Damselfly Ischnura elegans (Insecta: Odonata)

Martijn Hammers, Rosa Ana Sanchez-Guillen, Hans Van Gossum*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Female-limited color polymorphisms occur in a variety of animal taxa where excessive male sexual harassment may explain the coexistence of multiple female color morphs. In the color polymorphic damselfly Ischnura elegans, mature and immature female color morphs coexist at the mating site where males are in search for suitable mating partners. Here, we study male preference and female mating propensity for the two immature female morphs. As would be expected, compared to mature morphs, both immature female morphs mate much less. Within immature females, one morph consistently mates more frequently compared to the other morph, a pattern that is similar for the ontogenetically corresponding mature female morphs. Preference experiments with the two differently colored immature female morphs, however, did not indicate male mate preference for either morph. Low mating frequencies of immature females at natural sites in combination with relatively high attractiveness of immature models in terms of male preference indicate that female behavior influences female mating success.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)324-337
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of insect behavior
Volume22
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul-2009

Keywords

  • Color polymorphism
  • male preference
  • mating success
  • Odonata
  • Ischnura elegans
  • ALTERNATIVE REPRODUCTIVE STRATEGIES
  • RAMBURI ZYGOPTERA
  • WATER STRIDERS
  • VANDER LINDEN
  • MATE CHOICE
  • FREQUENCY
  • POLYMORPHISM
  • HARASSMENT
  • EVOLUTION
  • COENAGRIONIDAE

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