Distribution of Effort-Reward Imbalance in Denmark and Its Prospective Association With a Decline in Self-Rated Health

Reiner Rugulies*, Birgit Aust, Johannes Siegrist, Olaf von dem Knesebeck, Ute Bultmann, Jakob B. Bjorner, Hermann Burr

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To analyze the distribution of effort-reward imbalance (ERI) and to investigate its impact on self-rated health in a representative sample of the Danish workforce. Methods: We studied 4977 employees who responded to a questionnaire in 2000, of which 3470 responded to a follow-up survey in 2005. Results: The highest (ie, most unfavorable) ERI ratio was found in executives in the public sector, social workers, managing clerks in the public sector, and medical secretaries. A one standard deviation increase of the ERI ratio predicted a 12% (95% confidence intervals = 1.01 to 1.24) decline in self-rated health after adjustment for all covariates. Conclusions: This is the first study that identified job groups with a high exposure to ERI in a representative sample of a national workforce. ERI was a risk factor for a decline in self-rated health: (J Occup Environ Med. 2009;51:870-878)

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)870-878
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Volume51
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug-2009

Keywords

  • CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE
  • JOB STRESS RESEARCH
  • PSYCHOSOCIAL WORK-ENVIRONMENT
  • NEGATIVE AFFECTIVITY
  • MENTAL-HEALTH
  • WHITEHALL-II
  • REPORTED HEALTH
  • BATH WATER
  • DONT THROW
  • PREDICTORS

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