Factors Influencing Preferences and Responses Towards Drug Safety Communications: A Conjoint Experiment Among Hospital-Based Healthcare Professionals in the Netherlands

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Abstract

Introduction Healthcare professionals (HCPs) are informed about new drug safety issues through Direct Healthcare Professional Communications (DHPCs). The influence of DHPC content on the impact of the communication is unclear. Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the effect of content elements 'frequency of the safety issue', 'seriousness of the safety issue', 'need to take action', 'life span of drug involved' and 'type of evidence supporting the safety issue' on hospital-based HCPs' preferences and responses towards DHPCs. Methods A survey study including a conjoint experiment was performed among hospital-based HCPs in the Netherlands. Hypothetical DHPCs varying on the five content elements were constructed. Each respondent received eight out of 16 hypothetical DHPCs and was asked about (1) importance to be informed (fixed-point scale), (2) preferred communication timing (multiple options) and (3) their stated actions (multiple options). Associations were tested using generalized linear mixed models. Results In total, 178 HCPs participated. DHPCs concerning more frequent or serious safety issues, or requiring action, were associated with a higher perceived importance to be informed and a preference for immediate communication. Periodic communication was preferred for DPHCs concerning less frequent or serious safety issues. The most commonly stated action was to discuss the DHPC with colleagues. Monitoring was common when this was recommended. High frequency and seriousness were associated with more prescribing-related actions. Conclusion Frequency and seriousness of the safety issue and the recommended action are likely to influence the impact of DHPCs. The timing of communication could be tailored depending on the content, where less urgent safety issues might be communicated periodically.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1369-1380
Number of pages12
JournalDrug Safety
Volume45
Early online date15-Sept-2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov-2022

Keywords

  • PRESCRIBING ALERTS
  • IMPACT

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