Freedom under an Indifferent Dictator: Intentionality and Responsibility

Frank Hindriks*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Freedom is often analysed in terms of the absence of intentionally imposed constraints. I defend the alternative view on which the relevant constraints are those for which some agent can be held morally responsible. I argue that this best captures the relation between freedom and respect. Berlin (1969) correctly points out that intentional restrictions exhibit ill will and hence are disrespectful. However, the same holds, I argue, for restrictions that are due to indifference. Berlin also observed that it would be counterintuitive if an agent could increase her freedom by changing her preferences. I criticize the argument that Dowding and Van Hees (2007, 2008) present according to which this observation counts in favour of explicating freedom in terms of intentionality.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)25-41
Number of pages17
JournalEconomics and Philosophy
Volume33
Issue number1
Early online date7-Apr-2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar-2017

Keywords

  • freedom
  • indifference
  • intentional action
  • moral responsibility
  • COUNTERFACTUAL SUCCESS
  • MORAL WORTH
  • JUDGMENTS

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