Green Walls for a Restorative Classroom Environment: A Controlled Evaluation Study

Agnes E van den Berg, Janke E Wesselius, Jolanda Maas, Karin Tanja-Dijkstra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the present research, we evaluated the restorative impacts of green walls with living plants in classrooms of two elementary schools using a controlled, prospective design with baseline measurements and follow-ups at 2 and 4 months. At each time of measurement, children's (n = 170, age = 7-10) cognitive performance, well-being, and classroom evaluations were measured with attentional tests and self-report questionnaires. Results show that children in the four classrooms where a green wall was placed, as compared with children in control groups, scored better on a test for selective attention; processing speed was not affected by the green wall. The green wall also positively influenced children's classroom evaluations. There were no measurable effects of the green wall on children's self-reported well-being. The green walls were generally evaluated positively during the two follow-ups. These results provide some of the first empirical support for green walls as a means for restorative classroom design.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)791-813
Number of pages23
JournalEnvironment and Behavior
Volume49
Issue number7
Early online date23-Sep-2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1-Aug-2017

Keywords

  • green walls
  • schoolchildren
  • plants
  • classroom
  • attention
  • INTERIOR PLANTS
  • PERFORMANCE
  • SCHOOLS
  • STRESS
  • ATTENTION
  • RECOVERY
  • CHILDREN
  • IMPACT
  • ADHD

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