HIGHER LARYNGEAL PRESERVATION RATE AFTER CO(2) LASER SURGERY COMPARED WITH RADIOTHERAPY IN T1A GLOTTIC LARYNGEAL CARCINOMA

Michiel L. Schrijvers, Eva L. van Riel, Johannes A. Langendijk, Frederik G. Dikkers, Ed Schuuring, Jacqueline E. van der Wal, Bernard F. A. M. van der Laan*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

72 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Clinical outcome of endoscopic CO(2) laser surgery and radiotherapy in early-stage glottic laryngeal carcinoma is difficult to compare because of differences in treatment selection and patient groups. Therefore, we compared local control, overall survival, and laryngeal preservation in a homogenous group of patients with T1a glottic carcinoma with normal/diminished mucosal wave treated with either CO(2) laser surgery or radiotherapy.

Methods. Retrospective survival analysis was performed on 100 patients with T1a glottic carcinoma treated with CO(2) laser surgery (n = 49) or radiotherapy (n = 51), diagnosed at the University Medical Center Groningen between 1990 and 2004.

Results. No significant differences in local control and overall survival were found. Ultimate 5-year laryngeal preservation was significantly better in the CO(2) laser surgery group (95% vs 77%, p = .043).

Conclusion. Patients with T1a glottic carcinoma with normal/diminished mucosal wave treated with CO(2) laser surgery had a significantly better laryngeal preservation rate than patients treated with radiotherapy. (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 31: 759-764, 2009

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)759-764
Number of pages6
JournalHead and Neck: Journal of the Sciences and Specialties of the Head and Neck
Volume31
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun-2009

Keywords

  • CO(2) laser surgery
  • radiotherapy
  • laryngeal preservation
  • T1a glottic laryngeal carcinoma
  • head and neck cancer
  • SQUAMOUS-CELL CARCINOMA
  • LOCAL-CONTROL
  • EXTERNAL RADIOTHERAPY
  • LASER MICROSURGERY
  • CANCER
  • CORDECTOMY
  • SURVIVAL
  • RECURRENCE
  • N0

Cite this