Home-based Physical Activity to Alleviate Fatigue in Cancer Survivors: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

F. Huizinga*, Niek Westerink, Annette Berendsen, Annemiek Walenkamp-Hageman, Mathieu Greef ,de, Juliët Oude Nijeweeme, GH de Bock, Marjolein Y. Berger, Daan Brandenbarg

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleAcademicpeer-review

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Abstract

PURPOSE: Physical activity (PA) affects fatigue and mental health in cancer survivors favorably, but participation in PA interventions tends to be low. More participants may be reached by home-based PA due to greater accessibility and self-monitoring. This systematic review therefore evaluated the effects of home-based PA of low to moderate intensity on symptoms of fatigue, depression, and anxiety among cancer survivors.

METHODS: PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and Web of Science were systematically searched for randomized controlled trials. We included investigations of home-based PA interventions in adults treated curatively for cancer and evaluating fatigue, depression, or anxiety as outcomes. We performed a random-effect meta-analysis for the effects of PA interventions on fatigue in the short and long term. Sub-group analyses were performed for the frequency of counseling. Standardized mean differences (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals are reported.

RESULTS: Eleven articles comprising 1066 participants were included: 77% had a history of breast cancer, 14% of ovarian cancer, 4% of colorectal cancer, 4% of prostate cancer and 1% of "other" cancer (not specified). Concerning the outcomes, nine articles reported on fatigue and two reported on depression or anxiety. Meta-analyses showed a significant effect of home-based PA on fatigue immediately post-intervention (SMD = 0.22 [0.06-0.37]), at 3 months' follow-up (SMD = 0.27 [0.04-0.51]), and at 6-9 months' follow-up (SMD = 0.31 [0.08-0.55]). PA interventions that used frequent counseling were associated with larger improvements in fatigue than those using no or infrequent counseling.

CONCLUSION: Home-based PA interventions can reduce fatigue among adult cancer survivors for up to 9 months, and frequent counseling may improve the benefits of these interventions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2661-2674
Number of pages14
JournalMEDICINE AND SCIENCE IN SPORTS AND EXERCISE
Volume53
Issue number12
Early online date7-Jul-2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec-2021

Keywords

  • HOME-BASED
  • PHYSICAL ACTIVITY
  • CANCER SURVIVORS
  • FATIGUE
  • DEPRESSION
  • ANXIETY
  • QUALITY-OF-LIFE
  • RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL
  • EXERCISE INTERVENTIONS
  • ACTIVITY GUIDELINES
  • SYMPTOM CLUSTERS
  • RISK-FACTORS
  • PREVALENCE
  • PROGRAM
  • WALKING
  • CHEMOTHERAPY

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