Hydrochlorothiazide in intensive care unit-acquired hypernatremia: A randomized controlled trial

Marjolein M. C. O. van IJzendoorn*, Hanneke Buter, W. Peter Kingma, Matty Koopmans, Gerjan Navis, E. Christiaan Boerma

*Corresponding author for this work

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Abstract

Purpose: Thiazides are suggested as a treatment for intensive care unit (ICU)-acquired hypernatremia (IAH). The primary aim of the study was reducing serum sodium concentration (sNa) in patients with IAH with hydrochlorothiazide (HCT) in comparison to placebo. Secondary end points were a difference in urine sodium concentration (uNa) and duration of severe IAH.

Materials: A monocentric, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted in 50 patients with IAH and urine potassium + uNa less than sNa in a spot urine sample. Patients were randomized to HCT 25 mg or placebo 1 qd for maximal 7 days. Patients on renal replacement therapy, on medication inducing diabetes insipidus, or with recent use of diuretics were excluded. IAH was defined as sNa of at least 143 mmol/L.

Results: At baseline, sNa and uNa were comparable between groups. During the study period, sNa decreased significantly with median 4 mmol/L in both groups, with no significant difference between groups (P = .32). Median uNa increased significantly in both groups (46 [16-86] mmol/L in the HCT-group; 20 [10-66] mmol/L in the placebo group), with no difference between groups (P = .34). Median duration of sNa of at least 145 mmol/L was 3 days in both groups (P = .91).

Conclusion: HCT 25 mg 1 qd did not significantly affect sNa or uNa in patients with IAH. (C) 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)225-230
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Critical Care
Volume38
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr-2017

Keywords

  • Critical care
  • Hypematremia
  • Sodium
  • Electrolytes
  • Thiazide diuretics
  • Hydrochlorothiazide
  • THIAZIDE-INDUCED HYPONATREMIA
  • INCREASED MORTALITY
  • CRITICALLY-ILL
  • ICU
  • EPIDEMIOLOGY
  • PATHOGENESIS
  • DYSNATREMIA
  • DIURETICS
  • EXCRETION
  • WATER

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