Identification of Damage Associated Molecular Patterns and Extracellular Matrix Proteins as Major Constituents of the Surface Proteome of Lung Implantable Silicone/Nitinol Devices

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Abstract

Lung implantable devices have been widely adopted as mechanical interventions for a wide variety of pulmonary pathologies. Despite successful initial treatment, long-term efficacy can often be impacted by fibrotic or granulation tissue formation at the implant sites. This study aimed to explore the lung-device interface by identifying the adhered proteome on lung devices explanted from patients with severe emphysema. In this study, scanning electron microscopy is used to visualize the adhesion of cells and proteins to silicone and nitinol surfaces of explanted endobronchial valves. By applying high-resolution mass-spectrometry, the surface proteome of eight explanted valves is characterized, identifying 263 unique protein species to be mutually adsorbed on the valves. This subset is subjected to gene enrichment analysis, matched with known databases and further validated using immunohistochemistry. Enrichment analyses reveal dominant clusters of functionally-related ontology terms associated with coagulation, pattern recognition receptor signaling, immune responses, cytoskeleton organization, cell adhesion and migration. Matching results show that extracellular matrix proteins and damage-associated molecular patterns are cardinal in the formation of the surface proteome. This is the first study investigating the composition of the adhered proteome on explanted lung devices, setting the groundwork for hypothesis generation and further exploration. STATEMENT OF SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first study investigating the composition of the adhered proteome on explanted lung devices. Lung implantable devices have been widely adopted as mechanical interventions for pulmonary pathologies. Despite successful initial treatment, long-term efficacy can often be impacted by fibrotic or granulation tissue formation around the implant sites. We identified the adhered proteome on explanted lung devices using several techniques. We identified 263 unique protein species to be mutually adsorbed on explanted lung devices. Pathway analyses revealed that these proteins are associated with coagulation, pattern recognition receptor signaling, immune responses, cytoskeleton organization, cell adhesion and migration. Furthermore, we identified that especially extracellular matrix proteins and damage-associated molecular patterns were cardinal in the formation of the surface proteome.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)209-218
JournalActa Biomaterialia
Early online date13-Jan-2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15-Mar-2022

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