Identifying long-term patterns of work-related rumination: associations with job demands and well-being outcomes

Ulla Kinnunen*, Taru Feldt, Marjaana Sianoja, Jessica de Bloom, Kalevi Korpela, Sabine Geurts

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of this 2-year longitudinal study was to identify long-term patterns of work-related rumination in terms of affective rumination, problem-solving pondering, and lack of psychological detachment from work during off-job time. We also examined how the patterns differed in job demands and well-being outcomes. The data were collected via questionnaires in three waves among employees (N=664). Through latent profile analysis (LPA), five stable long-term patterns of rumination were identified: (1) no rumination (n=81), (2) moderate detachment from work (n=228), (3) moderate rumination combined with low detachment (n=216), (4) affective rumination (n=54), and (5) problem-solving pondering (n=85), both combined with low detachment. The patterns differed in the job demands and well-being outcomes examined. Job demands (time pressure, cognitive and emotional demands) were at the highest level across time in patterns 3-5 and lowest in pattern 1. Patterns 3 and 4 were associated with poorer well-being outcomes (higher job exhaustion and more sleeping problems, and lower work engagement) across time. By contrast, pattern 5 showed positive outcomes, especially high level of work engagement. Thus, the different patterns of work-related ruminative thoughts suggest diverse relationships with job demands and well-being.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)514-526
Number of pages13
JournalEuropean Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology
Volume26
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Rumination
  • detachment from work
  • recovery from work
  • work engagement
  • sleeping problems
  • job exhaustion
  • PERSEVERATIVE COGNITION
  • RECOVERY EXPERIENCES
  • SLEEP QUALITY
  • REPETITIVE THOUGHT
  • ENGAGEMENT
  • STRESS
  • MODEL
  • QUESTIONNAIRE
  • HEALTH
  • BEHAVIOR

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