Increased release of gentamicin from acrylic bone cements under influence of low-frequency ultrasound

JGE Hendriks, GT Ensing, [No Value] van Horn, J Lubbers, HC van der Mei, HJ Busscher*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The release profile of antibiotics from antibiotic-loaded bone cement, used to prevent infections in total joint arthroplasty, is neither ideal nor complete. Ultrasound has been used to allow drugs to cross otherwise impermeable barriers. The aim of this study was to establish a possible effect of ultrasound on antibiotic release from bone cements. Samples were made of three commercially available gentamicin-loaded bone cements. Part of the samples was allowed to release gentamicin for 3 weeks before insonation. An insonation device produced an ultrasound field with a time average acoustic intensity of 167 mW/cm(2) at a frequency of 46.5 kHz. The samples were exposed to the ultrasound field or not exposed to it as a control. The amount of gentamicin released was measured by fluorescence polarization immunoassay. There was a limited increase of gentamicin release with application of ultrasound in fresh samples but not in the samples that had been allowed to release gentamicin. For fresh samples, a linear regression model showed that this ultrasound effect was statistically significant. The mechanism behind these observations is not clear, but it is suggested that microstreaming or localized temperature rises may be involved. (C) 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)369-374
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Controlled Release
Volume92
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30-Oct-2003

Keywords

  • ultrasound
  • antibiotic release
  • gentamicin
  • bone cement
  • GRAM-NEGATIVE BACTERIA
  • IN-VIVO
  • STAPHYLOCOCCUS-EPIDERMIDIS
  • HIP-ARTHROPLASTY
  • AMINOGLYCOSIDES
  • ANTIBIOTICS
  • ENHANCEMENT
  • INFECTIONS
  • MECHANISM
  • SURFACES

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