Insulin-like growth factor 1 of wild vertebrates in a life-history context

Jaanis Lodjak*, Simon Verhulst

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Broad variation in intra- and interspecific life-history traits is largely shaped by resource limitation and the ensuing allocation trade-offs that animals are forced to make. Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), a growth-hormone-dependent peptide, may be a key player in the regulation of allocation processes. In laboratory animals, the effects of IGF-1 on growth- and development (positive), reproduction (positive), and longevity (negative) are well established. We here review the evidence on these effects in wild vertebrates, where animals are more likely to face resource limitation and other challenges. We point out the similarities and dissimilarities in patterns of IGF-1 functions obtained in these two different study settings and discuss the knowledge we need to develop a comprehensive picture of the role of IGF-1 in mediating life-history variation of wild vertebrates.

Original languageEnglish
Article number110978
Number of pages13
JournalMolecular and Cellular Endocrinology
Volume518
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1-Dec-2020

Keywords

  • Adaptation
  • Fitness
  • Hormone
  • Somatic maintenance
  • Trade-off
  • FACTOR-I IGF-1
  • BINDING PROTEIN-3 IGFBP-3
  • SKELETAL-MUSCLE
  • TELOMERASE ACTIVITY
  • SIGNALING PATHWAYS
  • OXIDATIVE STRESS
  • ZINC SUPPLEMENTATION
  • CIRCULATING LEVELS
  • HORMONE-SECRETION
  • STIMULATES GROWTH

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