Lifestyle-Related Exposure to Cadmium and Lead is Associated with Diabetic Kidney Disease

Ilse J. M. Hagedoorn*, Christina M. Gant*, Sanne v Huizen, Ronald G. H. J. Maatman, Gerjan Navis, Stephan J. L. Bakker, Gozewijn D. Laverman

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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Abstract

Background: Environmental factors contributing to diabetic kidney disease are incompletely understood. We investigated whether blood cadmium and lead concentrations were associated with the prevalence of diabetic kidney disease, and to what extent lifestyle-related exposures (diet and smoking) contribute to blood cadmium and lead concentrations. Material and methods: In a cross-sectional analysis in 231 patients with type 2 diabetes included in the DIAbetes and LifEstyle Cohort Twente (DIALECT-1), blood cadmium and lead concentrations were determined using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The associations between diet (derived from food frequency questionnaire), smoking and cadmium and lead were determined using multivariate linear regression. The associations between cadmium and lead and diabetic kidney disease (albumin excretion >30 mg/24 h and/or creatinine clearance

Original languageEnglish
Article number2432
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Clinical Medicine
Volume9
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug-2020

Keywords

  • alcohol
  • cadmium
  • diabetic kidney disease
  • diet
  • lifestyle related exposures
  • lead
  • proteinuria
  • smoking
  • type 2 diabetes
  • BLOOD CADMIUM
  • SERUM CREATININE
  • RENAL TOXICITY
  • POPULATION
  • NEPHROTOXICITY
  • PROTEINS
  • URINARY

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