Long-Term Efficacy of Voice Therapy in Patients With Voice Problems After Treatment of Early Glottic Cancer

Christine D. L. van Gogh*, Irma M. Verdonck-de Leeuw, Johannes A. Langendijk, Dirk J. Kuik, Hans F. Mahieu

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. The purpose of the present pilot study is to investigate whether the beneficial short-term effects of voice therapy in patients with voice problems after treatment of early glottic cancer as reported in our earlier study remain present on the long term.

Study Design. In this prospective study, 12 patients, selected based on a screening questionnaire about voice problems and randomly assigned for treatment with voice therapy (vs no treatment), were evaluated with a mean of 13 months after finishing voice therapy to evaluate the long-term voice effects.

Methods. Voice assessment consisted of the Voice Handicap Index (VHI) and acoustic analyses (percent jitter, percent shimmer, and noise-to-harmonics ratio).

Results. Statistical analysis showed that the beneficial short-term effect on the mean VHI, percent jitter, and shimmer remained stable after more than a year of follow-up.

Conclusions. The present study provides initial evidence that the beneficial effect of voice therapy is not just a short-lived voice improvement but may result in a better voice for a period of at least 1 year. Future long-term randomized controlled trials are needed to confirm our findings.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)398-401
Number of pages4
JournalJOURNAL OF VOICE
Volume26
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May-2012

Keywords

  • Early glottic cancer
  • Voice impairment
  • Voice therapy
  • Quality of life
  • QUALITY-OF-LIFE
  • SQUAMOUS-CELL CARCINOMA
  • RADIATION-THERAPY
  • LASER CORDECTOMY
  • LARYNGEAL-CANCER
  • VOCAL FUNCTION
  • RADIOTHERAPY
  • OUTCOMES
  • SURGERY
  • REHABILITATION

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