Maternal use of prednisolone is unlikely to be associated with neonatal adrenal suppression-a single-center study of 16 cases

Leanne de Vetten*, Margriet van Stuijvenberg, Ido P. Kema, Gianni Bocca

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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Abstract

The use of supra-physiological, exogenous corticosteroids in pregnancy may lead to neonatal adrenal suppression. We report on a single-center, case series study carried out between 2006 and 2014, which included all newborns (n = 16) of mothers using prednisolone >= 10 mg/day during pregnancy. Newborns were routinely assessed according to hospital protocol, with follow-up until 6 weeks after birth. We investigated the clinical symptoms and biochemical findings of adrenal suppression occurring in the newborns. Mean dose of maternal prednisolone was 29.7 +/- A 16.1 mg/day with a mean duration of 18.4 +/- A 15.4 weeks. Five newborns showed hypoglycemia with normal serum cortisol concentrations and urinary steroid profiles. Two newborns had abnormal urinary steroid profiles, probably the result of prematurity, but with adequate adrenal stress response during clinical sepsis.

Conclusion: In this retrospective case series, we found no evidence of prolonged effects of maternal prednisolone use during pregnancy on the neonatal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1131-1136
Number of pages6
JournalEuropean Journal of Pediatrics
Volume176
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug-2017

Keywords

  • Adrenal function
  • Adrenal suppression
  • Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis
  • Neonatal endocrinology
  • Prednisolone
  • HUMAN PLACENTA
  • BIRTH-WEIGHT
  • CORTISOL
  • PREGNANCIES
  • METABOLISM
  • PRETERM
  • INFANTS

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