Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in Elderly Patients Receiving Direct Oral Anticoagulants: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Juliette A L Santing*, Ying Xing Lee, Joukje van der Naalt, Crispijn L van den Brand, Korné Jellema

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

17 Citations (Scopus)
331 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The aim of this work was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies reporting on the risk of traumatic intracerebral hemorrhage (tICH), the course of tICH, and its treatment and mortality rates in elderly mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) patients using direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs). We consulted PubMed and Embase for relevant cohort and case-control studies with a control group. Two authors independently selected studies, assessed methodological quality, and extracted outcome data. Estimates were pooled with the Mantel-Haenszel random-effects method. We identified 16 articles comprising 3671 elderly mTBI patients using DOACs. Use of DOACs was associated with a reduced risk of tICH compared to the use of vitamin K antagonists (VKAs; odds ratio [OR], 0.44; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.29-0.65; I2 = 22%) and a similar risk compared to the use of antiplatelet therapy (APT; OR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.39-2.44; I2 = 0%). Reversal agent use and neurosurgical intervention rate were lower in patients using DOACs compared to patients using VKAs (OR, 0.10; 95% CI, 0.06-0.16; I2 = 0% and OR, 0.37; 95% CI, 0.21-0.67; I2 = 0%, respectively). There was no significant difference in neurosurgical intervention rate between patients who used DOACs versus patients who used APT (OR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.15-2.21; I2 = 41%) or no antithrombotic therapy (OR, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.20-2.86; I2 = 23%). ICH progression, risk of delayed ICH, and TBI-related in-hospital mortality were comparable among treatment groups. The present study indicates that elderly patients using DOACs have a lower risk of adverse outcome compared to patients using VKAs and a similar risk compared to patients using APT after mTBI.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)458-472
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Neurotrauma
Volume39
Issue number7-8
Early online date16-Feb-2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr-2022

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