Multidrug transporters from bacteria to man: similarities in structure and function

HW van Veen*, WN Konings

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

92 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Organisms ranging from bacteria to man possess transmembrane transporters which confer resistance to toxic corn pounds. Underlining their biological significance, prokaryotic and eukaryotic multidrug transport proteins are very similar in structure and function. Therefore, a study of the factors which determine the substrate specificity and energy coupling to drug translocation in 'simple' microorganisms has significance for multidrug resistance of mammalian cells. This chapter represents a comprehensive review in which we will summarize the current state of knowledge on three major aspects of drug efflux-based multidrug resistance: (i) the functional and structural similarities among secondary and ABC-type drug transporters encountered in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells; (ii) the molecular mechanism of these transporters; and (iii) their potential physiological role.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)183-191
Number of pages9
JournalSeminars in cancer biology
Volume8
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Jun-1997

Keywords

  • multidrug resistance
  • ATP-binding cassette transporter
  • MRP
  • P-glycoprotein
  • secondary transporter
  • TETRACYCLINE RESISTANCE PROTEIN
  • GLYCOPROTEIN GENE LEADS
  • HEAVY-METAL RESISTANCE
  • ESCHERICHIA-COLI
  • P-GLYCOPROTEIN
  • SACCHAROMYCES-CEREVISIAE
  • SUBSTRATE-SPECIFICITY
  • STAPHYLOCOCCUS-AUREUS
  • LACTOCOCCUS-LACTIS
  • MEMBRANE TOPOLOGY

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