Nature exposure predicts well-being trajectory groups among employees across two years

Kalevi Korpela*, Tapio Nummi, Liudmila Lipiainen, Jessica De Bloom, Marjaana Sianoja, Tytti Pasanen, Ulla Kinnunen

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    11 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    We investigated relations between various types of self-reported nature exposure at work and at home, and well-being among employees (N = 664) across two years. An electronic questionnaire was delivered three times, once a year. We identified seven employee groups with different long-term trajectories of four well-being indicators (vitality, happiness, vigor and creativity at work). More frequent physical activity (PA) in natural surroundings during free time in the first measurement increased the odds of belonging to long-term "beneficial" well-being groups after including control variables. The decrease in using one's home garden decreased the odds of belonging to one beneficial well-being group suggesting a threshold level, the decrease of which may diminish the chances of better well-being longitudinally. The dose-response relationships and the role of personal agency in the interaction with the natural environment deserve further attention. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)81-91
    Number of pages11
    JournalJournal of Environmental Psychology
    Volume52
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Oct-2017

    Keywords

    • Nature exposure
    • Hedonic
    • Eudaimonic
    • Well-being
    • Longitudinal
    • MENTAL-HEALTH
    • WORK ENGAGEMENT
    • GREEN SPACE
    • DEVELOPMENTAL TRAJECTORIES
    • SAS PROCEDURE
    • RECOVERY
    • BENEFITS
    • ENVIRONMENTS
    • PERFORMANCE
    • RUMINATION

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