Neuroscience and climate change: How brain recordings can help us understand human responses to climate change

Susie Wang*, Berry van den Berg

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)
130 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

There is little published neuroscience research on the psychology of climate change. This review outlines how carefully designed experiments that measure key neural processes, linked to specific cognitive processes, can provide powerful tools to answer research questions in climate change psychology. We review relevant literature from social neuroscience that can be applicable to environmental research-the neural correlates of fairness and cooperation, altruistic behaviour and personal values-and discuss important factors when translating environmental psychology constructs to neuroscientific measurement. We provide a practical overview of how to implement environmental neuroscience using electroencephalography, summarising important event-related potential components and how they can be used to answer questions in climate change psychology. Challenges for the field include accurate attribution of findings, both within and between studies, the need for interdisciplinary collaboration, peer review and reporting processes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)126-132
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent Opinion in Psychology
Volume42
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec-2021

Keywords

  • Brain
  • Climate Change
  • Electroencephalography
  • Evoked Potentials
  • Humans
  • Neurosciences

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