Neurovisual rehabilitation in multiple sclerosis: Why a close integration of low-vision rehabilitation and neuropsychological rehabilitation may be effective for visual complaints

F. E. van der Feen*, G. A. de Haan, I. van der Lijn, D. J. Heersema, J. F. Meilof, J. Heutink

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

16 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Objective: The quality of life of people with multiple sclerosis (MS) is often affected by visual complaints. A previous study suggested that visual complaints are not likely to be related to specific visual functions, but by a global decline of cognitive and visual functioning. In this study, we further explore this hypothesis, by investigating the relation between visual functions and global cognitive functioning, aiming to provide recommendations for rehabilitation for visual complaints. 

Design: Cross-sectional study. 

Setting: A rehabilitation centre for partially sighted and blind people and a MS centre at a university hospital. 

Participants: 102 people with MS. 

Main measure: Correlations between assessments of visual functions (acuity, contrast sensitivity, visual field, smooth pursuit and saccades) and composite scores of a neuropsychological assessment (tests with a visual component and without a visual component). 

Results: All composite scores correlated with visual acuity, contrast sensitivity and the sensitivity of the monocular field, but not with smooth pursuit and saccades. Similar patterns were found in various subgroups. Results showed that visual functions that related to visual complaints correlated with a diffuse decline of global cognitive functioning and that visual and cognitive functioning may decline concurrently in people with MS. 

Conclusions: Visual complaints may occur as a result of a diffuse decline of the integrity of a cerebral network involved in vision and cognition. People with MS with visual complaints may benefit from neurovisual rehabilitation, in which low-vision rehabilitation and neuropsychological rehabilitation are closely intertwined.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)393-402
Number of pages10
JournalClinical Rehabilitation
Volume38
Issue number3
Early online date3-Nov-2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar-2024

Keywords

  • low-vision rehabilitation
  • multiple sclerosis
  • neuropsychological rehabilitation
  • neurovisual rehabilitation
  • visual complaints

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Neurovisual rehabilitation in multiple sclerosis: Why a close integration of low-vision rehabilitation and neuropsychological rehabilitation may be effective for visual complaints'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this