Outcomes after treatment of complex aortic abdominal aneurysms with the fenestrated Anaconda endograft

Arne de Niet, Clark J. Zeebregts, Michel M. P. J. Reijnen*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To date, information on the fenestrated Anaconda endograft is limited to case series with a small sample size. This study was performed to assess the technical and clinical outcome of this device in a large international case series. Methods: All worldwide centers having treated more than 15 complex abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) or type IV thor- acoabdominal aortic aneurysm patients with the fenestrated Anaconda endograft were approached. Main outcome pa- rameters were procedural technical success, postoperative and follow-up clinical outcome for endoleaks, target vessel patency, reintervention rate, and patient survival. Results: Three hundred thirty-five consecutive cases treated between June 2010 and May 2018 in 11 sites were included. Patients were treated for a short neck infrarenal (n = 98), juxtarenal (n =191), suprarenal AAA (n = 27), or type IV thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (n =19). Mean age was 73.6 ? 4.6 years (292 male). Endografts contained a total of 920 fenestrations, with a mean of 2.7 ? 0.8 fenestrations per case. Technical success was 88.4% (primary, 82.7%; assisted primary 5.7%). In 6.9% of cases, a pro- cedural type IA endoleak was observed, spontaneously disappearing in 82.6% during early follow-up. The development of a type IA endoleak was associated with greater neck angulation (odds ratio [OR], 0.94; P = .01), three fenestrations (OR, 42.7; P = .01) and the presence of augmented proximal rings (OR, 0.17; P = .03). Median follow-up was 1.2 years (interquartile range, 0.4-2.6). The mean estimated glomerular filtration rate deteriorated from 67.6 ? 19.3 mL/min/1.73 m 2 preoperatively to 59.3 ? 22.7 mL/min/ 1.73 m 2 at latest follow-up ( P = .00). The freedom from AAA growth were 97.9 ? 0.9% (n =190) and 86.4 ? 3.0% (n = 68), with a freedom from AAA rupture of 99.7 ? 0.3% (n = 191) and 99.1 ? 0.7% (n = 68), at 1 and 3 years, respectively. The endoleak-free survival, excluding spontaneously resolved procedural endoleaks, at 1 and 3 years was 73.4 ? 2.6 (n = 143) and 65.6 ? 3.4% (n = 45), respectively. The target vessel patency at one and three years were 96.4 ? 0.7% (n = 493) and 92.7 ? 1.4% (n = 156), respectively. A total of 75 reinterventions were done in 64 cases (19.1%), of which 25 cases for an endoleak. The reintervention-free survival at 1 and 3 years were 83.6 ? 2.2% (n = 190) and 71.0 ? 3.7% (n = 68), respectively. No deaths during procedure, extending within 24 hours postoperatively, were observed. Within 30 days 14 patients (4.2%) died and during follow-up another 39 patients (11.6%) died. Three deaths were considered AAA related (one rupture, one endograft infection, and one bilateral renal artery occlusion). The estimated cumulative survival at 1 and 3 years were 89.8 ? 1.8% (n =191) and 79.2 ? 3.0% (n = 68), respectively. Conclusions: The custom-made fenestrated Anaconda endograft is a valuable option for the treatment of a complex AAA. A procedural type IA endoleak is seen relatively frequently, but spontaneously resolves in most cases. (J Vasc Surg 2020;72:25-35.)

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)25-35.e1
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Vascular Surgery
Volume72
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul-2020

Keywords

  • Abdominal aortic aneurysm
  • Fenestrated Anaconda
  • FEVAR
  • Endovascular
  • ENDOVASCULAR REPAIR
  • EDITORS CHOICE
  • RENAL-FUNCTION
  • EXPERIENCE
  • ENDOLEAKS
  • GRAFTS

Cite this