Ovalbumin-containing core-shell implants suitable to obtain a delayed IgG1 antibody response in support of a biphasic pulsatile release profile in mice

Katie Amssoms, Philip A Born, Max Beugeling, Ben De Clerck, Ellen Van Gulck, Wouter L J Hinrichs, Henderik W Frijlink, Niels Grasmeijer, Guenter Kraus, Roger Sutmuller, Kenny Simmen, Lieven Baert

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Abstract

A single-injection vaccine formulation that provides for both a prime and a boost immunization would have various advantages over a multiple-injection regime. For such a vaccine formulation, it is essential that the booster dose is released after a certain, preferably adjustable, lag time. In this study we investigated whether a core-shell based implant, containing ovalbumin as core material and poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) of various monomer ratios as shell material can be used to obtain such a booster release. An in vitro release study showed that the lag time after which the ovalbumin was released from the core-shell implant increased with increasing lactic to glycolic acid ratio of the polymer and ranged from 3-6 weeks. Fluorescence spectroscopy showed minimal differences between native ovalbumin and ovalbumin from core-shell implants that were incubated until just before the observed in vitro release. In addition, mice immunized with a subcutaneous inserted core-shell implant containing ovalbumin showed an ovalbumin-specific IgG1 antibody response after a lag time of 4 or 6-8 weeks. Moreover, delayed release of ovalbumin caused higher IgG1 antibody titers than conventional subcutaneous vaccination with ovalbumin dissolved in PBS. Collectively, these findings could contribute to the further development of a single-injection vaccine, making multiple injections of the vaccine superfluous.

Original languageEnglish
Article number0202961
Pages (from-to)e0202961
Number of pages14
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume13
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30-Aug-2018

Keywords

  • PLGA MICROSPHERES
  • IN-VITRO
  • VACCINE
  • FORMULATION
  • DEGRADATION
  • INFECTIONS
  • MECHANISMS
  • POWDER

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