Parental acceptance of children’s intimate ethnic outgroup relations: The role of culture, status, and family reputation

Anke Munniksma*, Andreas Flache, Maykel Verkuyten, René Veenstra

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    37 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Research on adolescents' interethnic relations indicates that parents can resist their children's ethnic outgroup relations. However, there is little insight into the underlying reasons for this. The current study examines how cultural groups differ in parental acceptance of their children's outgroup relations, and it examines the role of perceived family reputation vulnerability as well as parents' religiosity. In addition, it was investigated whether parental acceptance of outgroup relations differs for different outgroups. This was studied among Turkish (n = 49) and Dutch (n = 73) parents of first grade middle school students. Parental acceptance of intimate ethnic outgroup relations was lower among Turkish-Dutch than among Dutch parents. This difference was explained by group differences in perceived family reputation vulnerability and religiosity. It is concluded that concerns about culture transmission and family reputation are related to parental acceptance of outgroup contact, which explains differences in parental acceptance between cultural groups. In addition, status considerations seem to explain differences in parental acceptance of their children's close contacts with different outgroups. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)575-585
    Number of pages11
    JournalInternational Journal of Intercultural Relations
    Volume36
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jul-2012

    Keywords

    • Parents
    • Early adolescents
    • Ethnic outgroup contact
    • Family reputation
    • INTERGENERATIONAL TRANSMISSION
    • IMMIGRANT FAMILIES
    • FRIENDSHIP SEGREGATION
    • MEASUREMENT INVARIANCE
    • ACHIEVEMENT VALUES
    • EARLY ADOLESCENTS
    • SCHOOL CHOICE
    • SELF-ESTEEM
    • RACE
    • NETHERLANDS

    Cite this