Plasma bile acids are not associated with energy metabolism in humans

Gemma Brufau, Matthias J. Bahr, Bart Staels, Thierry Claudel, Johann Ockenga, Klaus H. W. Boker, Elizabeth J. Murphy, Kris Prado, Frans Stellaard, Michael P. Manns, Folkert Kuipers, Uwe J. F. Tietge*

*Corresponding author for this work

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    Abstract

    Bile acids (BA) have recently been shown to increase energy expenditure in mice, but this concept has not been tested in humans. Therefore, we investigated the relationship between plasma BA levels and energy expenditure in humans. Type 2 diabetic (T2DM) patients (n = 12) and gender, age and BMI-matched healthy controls (n = 12) were studied before and after 8 weeks of treatment with a BA sequestrant. In addition, patients with liver cirrhosis (n = 46) were investigated, since these display elevated plasma BA together with increased energy expenditure. This group was compared to gender-, age- and BMI-matched healthy controls (n = 20). Fasting plasma levels of total BA and individual BA species as well as resting energy expenditure were determined. In response to treatment with the BA sequestrant, plasma deoxycholic acid (DCA) levels decreased in controls (-60%, p <0.05) and T2DM (-32%, p <0.05), while chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) decreased in controls only (-33%, p <0.05). Energy expenditure did not differ between T2DM and controls at baseline and, in contrast to plasma BA levels, was unaffected by treatment with the BA sequestrant. Total BA as well as individual BA species did not correlate with energy expenditure at any time throughout the study. Patients with cirrhosis displayed on average an increase in energy expenditure of 18% compared to values predicted by the Harris-Benedict equation, and plasma levels of total BA (up to 12-fold) and individual BA (up to 20-fold) were increased over a wide range. However, neither total nor individual plasma BA levels correlated with energy expenditure. In addition, energy expenditure was identical in patients with a cholestatic versus a non-cholestatic origin of liver disease while plasma total BA levels differed four-fold between the groups. In conclusion, in the various (patho) physiological conditions studied, plasma BA levels were not associated with changes in energy expenditure. Therefore, our data do not support an important role of circulating BA in the control of human energy metabolism.

    Original languageEnglish
    Article number73
    Number of pages5
    JournalNutrition & Metabolism
    Volume7
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 3-Sep-2010

    Keywords

    • LIVER-TRANSPLANTATION
    • BODY-COMPOSITION
    • GASTRIC BYPASS
    • EXPENDITURE
    • CIRRHOSIS
    • PROTEIN
    • MICE
    • PARAMETERS
    • GLUCOSE

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