Predicting undergraduates' academic achievement: the role of the curriculum, time investment and self-regulated learning

Marjolein Torenbeek*, Ellen Jansen, Cor Suhre

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The time students invest in their studies and their resulting achievement is partly dependent on curriculum characteristics. Degree programmes differ greatly with respect to how the curriculum is organized, for example in the type (e.g. lectures, practicals) and the number of classes. The focus of this study is on the relationships between curriculum characteristics, self-regulated learning, time investment and achievement. Structural equation modelling was used to study the relations between these variables in a sample of 200 bachelor degree students in four degree programmes. Results show separate positive effects of the number of scheduled classes and class attendance on academic achievement. At the same time, more scheduled lectures and practicals lead to lower class attendance and time spent on self-study. Self-discipline and motivation predict achievement indirectly through class attendance.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1393-1406
Number of pages14
JournalStudies in Higher Education
Volume38
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1-Nov-2013

Keywords

  • academic achievement
  • self-regulated learning
  • curriculum design
  • self-study
  • class attendance
  • COLLEGE-STUDENTS
  • UNIVERSITY-EDUCATION
  • PERFORMANCE
  • SUCCESS
  • MOTIVATION
  • PROGRESS
  • GRADES
  • ORGANIZATION
  • PERSONALITY
  • SECONDARY

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