Prevention of Major Depression in Complex Medically Ill Patients: Preliminary Results From a Randomized, Controlled Trial

Peter de Jonge*, Fatima Bel Hadj, Daria Boffa, Catherine Zdrojewski, Yves Dorogi, Alexander So, Juan Ruiz, Friedrich Stiefel

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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Abstract

Background: Depression is highly prevalent in patients with physical illness and is associated with a diminished quality of life and poorer medical outcomes. Objective: The authors evaluated whether a multifaceted intervention conducted by a psychiatric consultation-liaison nurse could reduce the incidence of major depression in rheumatology inpatients and diabetes outpatients with a high level of case complexity. Method: Of 247 randomized patients, the authors identified 100 patients with a high level of case complexity at baseline and without major depression (65 rheumatology and 35 diabetes patients). Patients were randomized to usual care (N = 53) or to a nurse-led intervention (N = 47). Main outcomes were the incidence of major depression and severity of depressive symptoms during a 1-year follow-up, based on quarterly assessments with standardized psychiatric interviews. Results: The incidence of major depression was 63% in usual-care patients and 36% in the intervention group. Effects of intervention on depressive symptoms were observed in outpatients with diabetes but not in rheumatology inpatients. Conclusion: These preliminary results based on subgroup analysis suggest that a multifaceted nurse-led intervention may prevent the occurrence of major depression in complex medically ill patients and reduce depressive symptoms in diabetes outpatients. (Psychosomatics 2009; 50: 227-233)

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)227-233
Number of pages7
JournalPsychosomatics
Volume50
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Keywords

  • HEALTH-SERVICE NEEDS
  • HOSPITAL STAY
  • DOUBLE-BLIND
  • INPATIENTS
  • DISORDERS
  • CARE
  • RELIABILITY
  • SERTRALINE
  • LENGTH
  • LIFE

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