Price and prejudice: the politics of carbon market establishment in Turkey

Ethemcan Turhan*, Arif Cem Gundogan

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)
12 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Despite concerns on their effectiveness and legitimacy, carbon markets are often presented as the main tool of climate policy. Developing countries are particularly eager to establish and interlink their carbon markets to benefit from global climate investment flows. Turkey is a belated but willing player in this endeavor. In tracing the ambivalent politics of establishing a carbon market in Turkey, we focus on the perceptions of different actors vis-a-vis carbon marketization attempts. Using policy documents, 22 expert interviews, and process tracing, we question the underlying assumptions on carbon markets in a country with unambitious climate targets. Our findings suggest that the making of carbon market in Turkey is not necessarily a rational, national interest-driven process but instead one promoted by the international organizations including World Bank and the EU. We conclude that this preference for market-based instruments defer public interest, favor more incremental policies, and ignore distributive justice concerns.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)512-540
Number of pages29
JournalTurkish Studies
Volume20
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 8-Aug-2019
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Climate change policy
  • carbon market
  • emissions trading
  • EU ETS
  • Turkey
  • ENVIRONMENTAL-POLICY
  • CLIMATE-CHANGE
  • EMISSION
  • NEOLIBERALISM
  • ACCUMULATION
  • GOVERNANCE
  • ECONOMY

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