Radiation-induced hypothyroidism in head and neck cancer patients: A systematic review

Marjolein J. Boomsma*, Hendrik P. Bijl, Johannes A. Langendijk

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

70 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To review literature on the relationship between the dose distribution in the thyroid gland and the incidence of radiation-induced hypothyroidism in adults.

Material and Methods: Articles were identified through a search in MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library. Approximately 2449 articles were screened and selected by inclusion- and exclusion criteria. Eventually, there were five papers that fulfilled the eligibility criteria to be included in this review.

Results: The sample sizes of the reviewed studies vary from 57 to 390 patients. The incidence of hypothyroidism was much higher (23-53%) than would be expected in a non-irradiated cohort. There was a large heterogeneity between the studies regarding study design, estimation of the dose to the thyroid gland and definition of endpoints. In general, the relationship between thyroid gland volume absorbing 10-70 Gy (V10-V70), mean dose (Dmean), minimal dose (Dmin), maximum dose (Dmax) and point doses with hypothyroidism were analysed. An association between dose-volume parameters and hypothyroidism was found in two studies.

Conclusions: Hypothyroidism is frequently observed after radiation. Although the results suggest that higher radiation doses to the thyroid gland are associated with hypothyroidism, it was not possible to define a clear threshold radiation dose for the thyroid gland. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved. Radiotherapy and Oncology 99 (2011) 1-5

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-5
Number of pages5
JournalRadiotherapy and Oncology
Volume99
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr-2011

Keywords

  • Radiotherapy
  • Dose-effect relationship
  • Hypothyroidism
  • Thyroid gland
  • Head and neck cancer
  • SUBCLINICAL HYPOTHYROIDISM
  • THYROID-DISORDERS
  • NORMAL TISSUE
  • RADIOTHERAPY

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