Red light-induced acidification by pea leaf epidermal cells is regulated by more than one phytochrome

J.T.M. Elzenga, M Staal, H.B A Prins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Leaves of pea (Pisum sativum L.) grown in red light develop normally, provided that functional phytochrome B is present. In the chromophore mutant pcd2 and in the phytochrome B mutant 1v the leaves remain small. Although some chlorophyll development takes place, the leaf size of red light-grown mutant plant resembles that of plants grown in complete darkness. In white light the leaf development in both mutants was comparable to wild type plants. The failure to expand its leaves in the phytochrome mutants was not due to reduced cell division in the epidermis. Leaves developed in red light had a similar number of cells as leaves grown in white light. The difference in leaf size could completely be explaned by the difference in individual cell expansion. Compared to the rate in wild type plants, the light-induced acidification, a major determinant of cell expansion, was reduced in the phytochrome chromophore mutant and in the red light-grown phytochrome B mutant, but was not reduced in white light-grown phytochrome B mutant. The role of phytochrome in light-induced acidification and cell expansion is discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)35-44
Number of pages10
JournalPhyton-Annales rei botanicae
Volume40
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2000
EventSymposium on Plant Adapation to Stress - , Netherlands
Duration: 25-Jun-1999 → …

Keywords

  • phytochrome
  • signal transduction
  • acidification
  • cell expansion
  • Pisum sativum
  • ARABIDOPSIS DEVELOPMENT
  • PISUM-SATIVUM
  • ARGENTEUM MUTANT
  • EXPANSION
  • BLUE
  • SENSITIVITY
  • SEEDLINGS
  • QUALITY
  • LEAVES

Cite this