Reduction of residual limb volume in people with transtibial amputation

Audrey T. Tantua, Jan H. B. Geertzen*, Jan J. A. M. van den Dungen, Jan-Kees C. Breek, Pieter U. Dijkstra

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)
55 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The early postoperative phase after transtibial amputation is characterized by rapid residual limb volume reduction. Accurate measurement of residual limb volume is important for the timing of fitting a prosthesis. The aim of this study was to analyze the reduction of residual limb volume in people with transtibial amputation and to correlate residual limb volume with residual limb circumference. In a longitudinal cohort study of 21 people who had a transtibial amputation, residual limb volume was measured using a laser scanner and circumference was measured using a tape measure 1 wk postamputation and every 3 wk thereafter until 24 wk postamputation. A linear mixed model analysis was performed with weeks postamputation transformed according to the natural logarithm as predictor. Residual limb volume decreased significantly over time, with a large variation between patients. Residual limb volume did not correlate well with circumference. On average, residual limb volume decreased 200.5 mL (9.7% of the initial volume) per natural logarithm of the weeks postamputation. The decrease in residual limb volume following a transtibial amputation was substantial in the early postamputation phase, followed by a leveling off. It was not possible to determine the specific moment at which the residual limb volume stabilized.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1119-1126
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Rehabilitation Research and Development
Volume51
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Keywords

  • amputation
  • fluctuation
  • laser scanner
  • longitudinal study
  • lower limb
  • measurements
  • rehabilitation
  • residual limb
  • residual limb volume
  • transtibial
  • AMPUTEES
  • PROSTHETICS
  • SHAPE

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